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Fish known for sustainability is invasive species on islands NEW YORK (January 12, 2010)—The poster child for sustainable fish farming—the tilapia—is actually a problematic invasive species for the native fish of the islands of Fiji, according to a new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and other groups. Scientists suspect that tilapia introduced to the waterways of the Fiji Islands may be gobbling up the larvae and juvenile fish of several native species of goby, fish that live in ...
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Known by seafood fans as one of the most sustainable options on the dinner menu, tilapia farmed in Fiji is gaining a new reputation as an invasive species that’s threatening the islands’ native fish.
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Noelle and Darwinia, two leatherback sea turtles from Gabon, are now wearing satellite tracking devices as they swim through the seas, aiding researchers studying the species' movements. Interested members of the public can also keep up with the turtles progress online.
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Ambitious atlas shows how 16 species use critical region of South Atlantic Ocean Data for the atlas was gathered by 25 scientists over ten years  NEW YORK ( NOVEMBER 10, 2009) -- Recording hundreds of thousands of individual uplinks from satellite transmitters fitted on penguins, albatrosses, sea lions, and other marine animals, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and BirdLife International have released ...
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WCS President and CEO Dr. Steven E. Sanderson, Appearing in Americas Quarterly: Does the 21st Century Belong to Asia or Latin America?Latin America Positioned to Lead On Climate Change and Sustainable Policies Sanderson Suggests a Three-Point Conservation Agenda for Latin America as a prelude to UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December (BRONX, NEW YORK, October 15, 2009) In the article “Growing Green,” appearing in the fall issue of the jour...
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Conservationists from WCS and other organizations use DNA to examine the mysterious movements of humpback whales through the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans.
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NEW YORK —After 15 years of research in the waters of the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and an international coalition of organizations have unveiled the largest genetic study of humpback whale populations ever conducted in the Southern Hemisphere. By analyzing DNA samples from more than 1,500 whales, researchers can now peer into the population dynamics and relatedness of Southern Hemi...
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October 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, 25, 31 and November 1, 2009 Brooklyn, NY — A safe and not (too) scary way to spend October weekends with the family. Join WCS’s New York Aquarium at the Haunted SeaFari Perils of the Deep adventure and a pumpkin-patch-filled arts and crafts center. Activities for this event are free with general admission and run from Noon to 4pm each day. Come down and see all of our sea monsters. Visit the Haunted SeaFari Perils of the Deep. This interactiv...
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Ten-Year, Public-Private Initiative Will Transform WCS's NY Aquarium and Jump Start the Re-Birth of Coney Island, Solidifying Brooklyn as a Destination for Tourists Worldwide and Sparking Economic Development Locally  Aquarium to Better Integrate Boardwalk, Ocean, and Protection of New York Waters BROOKLYN, NEW YORK (Sept. 17, 2009) – The Wildlife Conservation Society, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz and City Councilman Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. an...
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Recent arrests and prosecutions in Sumatra and Jakarta put the heat on illegal wildlife traders attempting to sell Sumatran tiger skins. WCS’s Wildlife Crime Unit played a key role in the arrests.
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