News Releases


Tigers


Laos, China and Viet Nam Enhance Cooperation to Combat Transnational Wildlife Trafficking Networks
April 7, 2016 – Frontline enforcement officers from key provinces, ports and border posts in Laos, China and Viet Nam completed an inter-agency field mission this week to share experiences, approaches and update the situation on wildlife smuggling networks along the major Indo-Burma trade route. 
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Endangered Tiger Killed in Myanmar Came from Thailand
MARCH 9, 2016 - Experts from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) say that a tiger killed on Feb 25th in Myanmar came from a protected area in neighboring Thailand that currently hosts between 60 and 70 tigers.
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With Help, Tigers Clawing Back in Southeast Asia
February 18, 2016 – A new study by a team of Thai and international scientists finds that a depleted tiger population in Thailand is rebounding thanks to enhanced protection measures. 
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 WCS Praises Government of Thailand for Swift Action in Tiger Arrest
November 18, 2015 – The following statement is from WCS’s Joe Walston, Vice President of Global Conservation praising the government of Thailand for arrests of alleged poacher who killed a tiger last seen alive in Huai Kha Khaeng (HKK) Wildlife Sanctuary.
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August 13 -Tiger Poachers and Dealer Busted In Indonesia
The Acehnese provincial Police (Polda Aceh), the East Acehnese Police (Polres Aceh Timur), and the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Wildlife Crimes Unit (WCU) announced today an enforcement action against wildlife poachers and a dealer for trading tiger parts. The perpetrators were arrested in Aceh Tamiang, Aceh on August 8, 2015. 
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Saving the Unloved, One Crowd at a Time
New York - August 10, 2015 - A newly released study from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) offers hope of conservation to the world’s low-profile and more unloved members of the animal kingdom. The study, which appears in the international conservation journal, Oryx, demonstrates that a “Wisdom of Crowds” method can successfully be used to determine the conservation status of species when more expensive standard field methods are not feasible.
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July 23 - Closing Roads to Save Tigers
A logging company, working with local authorities and WCS, has agreed to begin dismantling abandoned logging roads currently being used by poachers to access prime Amur (Siberian) tiger habitat in the Russian Far East.
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National Geographic’s “Biggest and Baddest” Series Features the Tree-climbing Lions of Uganda
July 1, 2015—The tree-climbing lions of Uganda and the Wildlife Conservation Society’s efforts to save them will be featured on National Geographic’s “Biggest and Baddest,” a new show about the world’s most legendary predators.
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April 25 - Seventh Annual WCS Run for the Wild at the WCS Bronx Zoo
More than 5,000 ran, jogged, and walked through the WCS Bronx Zoo in support of gorilla and wildlife conservation at the seventh annual WCS Run for the Wild. 
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Tiger Dad: Rare Family Portrait of Amur Tigers the First-Ever to Include an Adult Male

NEW YORK (
March 6, 2015) –The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Russia Program, in partnership with the Sikhote-Alin Biosphere Reserve and Udegeiskaya Legenda National Park, released a camera trap slideshow of a family of Amur tigers in the wild showing an adult male with family. Shown following the “tiger dad” along the Russian forest is an adult female and three cubs. Scientists note this is a first in terms of photographing this behavior, as adult male tigers are usually solitary.  Also included was a photo composite of a series of images showing the entire family as they walked past the a camera trap over a period of two minutes.
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