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Species


Matchmaking Goes a Long Way for Animals New York, N.Y. -- Experience the wild side of romance at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s zoos this Valentine’s Day. While we humans exchange heart-shaped boxes and red roses, creatures of all kinds at the zoos will be showing their own version of animal magnetism. An array of exotic wildlife lives at each WCS facility. Some animals prefer to live alone; others chose to live in very large groups that can sometimes be dominated by one high-ranking...
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Executive Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Africa Program, Dr. James Deutsch Testifies before Congress on the Great Ape Conservation Reauthorization and Amendment Act Lauds Representatives George Miller and Madeleine Bordallo for Efforts to Save Humanity’s Closest Relatives NEW YORK (January 27, 2010)  Dr. James Deutsch, Executive Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Africa Program, testified today before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Insular Aff...
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WCS conservationists working in a remote valley in Afghanistan find the breeding grounds for the "world's least known bird."
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NEW YORK (January 13, 2010)—Researchers for the Wildlife Conservation Society have discovered for the first time the breeding area of the large-billed reed warbler—dubbed in 2007 as “the world’s least known bird species”—in the remote and rugged Wakhan Corridor of the Pamir Mountains of north-eastern Afghanistan. Using a combination of astute field observations, museum specimens, DNA sequencing, and the first known audio recording of the species, researchers verified the discovery by capturing...
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Fish known for sustainability is invasive species on islands NEW YORK (January 12, 2010)—The poster child for sustainable fish farming—the tilapia—is actually a problematic invasive species for the native fish of the islands of Fiji, according to a new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and other groups. Scientists suspect that tilapia introduced to the waterways of the Fiji Islands may be gobbling up the larvae and juvenile fish of several native species of goby, fish that live in ...
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Known by seafood fans as one of the most sustainable options on the dinner menu, tilapia farmed in Fiji is gaining a new reputation as an invasive species that’s threatening the islands’ native fish.
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Noelle and Darwinia, two leatherback sea turtles from Gabon, are now wearing satellite tracking devices as they swim through the seas, aiding researchers studying the species' movements. Interested members of the public can also keep up with the turtles progress online.
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“Limestone leaf warbler” has a unique call, setting it apart from other warblersWarbler was found in limestone region in Laos, home to treasure trove of new species NEW YORK – (December 21, 2009) A diminutive, colorful bird living in the rocky forests of Laos and Vietnam has been discovered by a team of scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Lao PDR Department of Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Swedish Museum of Natural History, BirdLife ...
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WCS helps discover the limestone leaf warbler, a small yellow bird with a distinctive call, in Laos. The bird’s home in the Southeast Asian country’s limestone region has become known as a treasure trove of new species.

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WCS President and CEO Steve Sanderson appeared on WNET's Worldfocus and in a podcast for Scientific American to discuss climate change as world leaders gathered in Copenhagen to try to find agreement on how to protect the planet from future greenhouse gas emissions.
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