Tiger


Tigers are a priority species for WCS-India. Our long-term goal for our tiger conservation efforts are to ensure there are multiple thriving populations of tigers in India that are embraced by Indian society.  We contribute to the conservation of tigers primarily through the wide variety of field activities we pursue in the Western and Eastern Ghats landscapes, as well as through policy efforts, voluntary relocation, carnivore conflict management, support to enforcement agencies, and capacity building.


The Western Ghats landscape is home to one of the largest tiger populations in the world. Although large, this tiger population is nevertheless threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching of tigers themselves as well as their prey, and from retaliatory killing of tigers due to conflict with humans. To contribute to the conservation of tigers in the Western Ghats, WCS-India undertakes the following activities: supports the government with tiger habitat consolidation; provides technical support on law enforcement actions that protect tigers, their prey, and their habitat; helps in capacity building for enforcement agencies; implements practical solutions to human-tiger conflict; and monitors tiger and prey populations using cutting-edge scientific techniques. 


The Eastern Ghats landscape is currently home to a robust tiger population that nevertheless has great potential to grow. Tigers in the Eastern Ghats are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching of tigers themselves as well as their prey, and from retaliatory killing of tigers due to conflict with humans. To contribute to the conservation of tigers in the Eastern Ghats, WCS-India undertakes the following activities: supports the government with tiger habitat consolidation; provides technical support on law enforcement actions that protect tigers, their prey, and their habitat; implements practical solutions to human-tiger conflict; undertakes capacity building for forest frontline staff and enforcement agencies, conducts programs on awareness and exposure to tiger conservation in schools; and monitors tiger and prey populations using cutting-edge scientific techniques. 


WCS-India’s long-term database, derived mainly from our camera trap surveys, now includes nearly 1000 individual tigers. Using our database, we assist governments in the identification of individual tigers.


To support tiger conservation, WCS-India also pursues the following policy interventions:


Carnivore conflict management 

As a member of the Human-Wildlife Conflict Committee of Andhra Pradesh, WCS-India provides updates on mitigation strategies and are formulating a state-level policy for conflict management. We have also helped to frame policy for the speedy disposal of cattle kill compensation.


Voluntary relocation

WCS-India assists villages interested in Government funded voluntary relocation. Once communities demand relocation, we work with various departments to take forward the will of the people as per government policies while also supporting the government in these endeavours.


Capacity building workshops

We partner with the Telangana and Andhra Pradesh forest departments and Telangana State Forest Academy to conduct regular training on ecological monitoring, including tiger and prey monitoring, and ecological methods. 





Program Partners

          




RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Peer –reviewed papers:

Kumar, A., Karanth, K. U., Jathanna, D. (2020) Tigers and leopards coexist despite similarities in space use and habitat selection. CATnews 71: 20-23.

http://www.catsg.org/index.php?id=611&L=0%3Fid%3D192%3Fid%3D49%3Fid%3D31%3Fid%3D 


Lele, A., Arasumani, M., Vishnudas, C. K., Joshi, V., Jathanna, D., V. V. Robin. (2020) Elevation and landscape change drive the distribution of a montane, endemic grassland bird. Ecology and Evolution. Early view version.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ece3.6500 

 

Goswami, V. R., Yadava, M. K., Vasudev, D., Prasad, P. K., Sharma, P., Jathanna, D. (2019) Towards a reliable assessment of Asian elephant population parameters: the application of photographic spatial capture–recapture sampling in a priority floodplain ecosystem. Scientific Reports 9: 8578.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44795-y.pdf?origin=ppub 


Preprints:

Pucci, R., Shankaraiah, J., Jathanna, D., Karanth, K. U., Subr, K. (2020). WhoAmI: An Automatic Tool for Visual Recognition of Tiger and Leopard Individuals in the Wild. arXiv: 2006.09962.

https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.09962 


Lele, A., Arasumani, M., Vishnudas, C. K., Jathanna, D., Robin, V. V. (2019) Local extinction of a montane, endemic grassland bird driven by landscape change across its global distribution. BioRxiv 695536.

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/695536v1.full 


Photo Copyrights: Deeksha Sharma

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Contact Information
Address: 551, 7th Main Road Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, 2nd Phase Bengaluru - 560097 Karnataka, India https://g.page/WCS-India?share | 080-2973-7455