Dr. John Weaver - Conservation Scientist


John Weaver is a carnivore conservation biologist for WCS based in Missoula, Montana with field programs in the western United States and Canada.   Recently, his research and conservation activities have increasingly focused on Canada, with field programs in Nahanni National Park and the Crowsnest Pass region of central Alberta.


Over the past 25 years, John has played many key roles in large carnivore conservation in the United States and Canada.  His dissertation research was on the ecology of wolf predation in the high-diversity ungulate environment of Jasper National Park, Alberta.  John has held leadership positions with the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service on endangered species Grizzlyand has served on several recovery teams, including for both wolves and grizzly bears. 
 
Over the years, he has perfected hair snaring techniques for lynx and bear surveys and invented a lynx lure that is now widely used. He has authored more than 20 scientific publications and served as a reviewer for five scientific journals. John has an academic appointment at the University of Montana.  He is particularly interested in conservation strategies that address the resiliency mechanisms of vulnerable species.

 

     

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Publications

Use of Scented Hair Snares to Detect Ocelots
Use of Scented Hair Snares to Detect Ocelots. John L. Weaver, Peggy Wood, David Paetkau, Linda L. Laack. 2005. Wildlife Society Bulletin. Biologists need a variety of tools to determine the population and genetic status of theocelot (Leopardus pardalis), an elusive Neotropical cat that favors dense habitats. We developed and tested a technique that entices ocelots to rub on scented hair snares and uses DNA analysis of the hair to determine species, gender, and individual identity.
BIG ANIMALS and SMALL PARKS Implications of Wildlife Distribution and Movements for Expansion of Nahanni National Park Reserve - French Summary
BIG ANIMALS and SMALL PARKS Implications of Wildlife Distribution and Movements for Expansion of Nahanni National Park Reserve - English Summary
BIG ANIMALS and SMALL PARKS Implications of Wildlife Distribution and Movements for Expansion of Nahanni National Park Reserve
BIG ANIMALS and SMALL PARKS: Implications of Wildlife Distribution and Movements for Expansion of Nahanni National Park Reserve. John Weaver. WCS Canada Conservation Report No 1. 2006.
Conserving Caribou Landscapes in the Nahanni Trans-Border Region - English Summary
Conserving Caribou Landscapes in the Nahanni Trans-Border Region - French Summary
Carnivores in the Southern Canadian Rockies Core Areas and Connectivity Across the Crowsnest Highway - English Summary
Carnivores in the Southern Canadian Rockies Core Areas and Connectivity Across the Crowsnest Highway - French Summary
A Pond of Gold - Storing Water Naturally
Water … we can’t live without it. No substitute exists for this precious and beautiful resource, which has usually been scarce in the Rocky Mountain West. In the future, the flow of water may decline as our climate becomes warmer and drier. The amount of snowpack in the mountains will be less, melting and runoff will occur earlier in the spring, and stream flow will diminish earlier in summer. By late summer when we need water the most, it may be in short supply. Many people believe that water will be the new gold of the future. As the reality of climate change becomes ever more apparent, we will need to catch and store water more effectively. We’ve given water lots of advice,in the form of expensive dams and big reservoirs but is that always the best solution? Likely not. Have we overlooked a natural ally in our efforts to conserve and manage water? Yes, consider the beaver!
Strategic Conservation Assessment for the northern boreal mountains of Yukon and British Columbia
This document, a Strategic Conservation Assessment, provides much of the information needed to direct WCS Canada’s work in the Northern Boreal Mountains site in the next 5 to 10 years. It outlines the scope and components of the regional conservation challenge, and provides an overview of our opportunities for future and long-term engagement through field-based science, administrative process, policy and regulatory review, and political engagement.
Conservation Value of Roadless Areas for Vulnerable Fish and Wildlife Species in the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem, Montana.
The purpose of this report is to inform discussions and decisions about the remaining roadless areas in the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem, Montana. The goal is to assess the conservation value of 1.33 million acres of roadless areas for a suite of vulnerable species using latest scientific information about their occurrence and conservation needs.

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